Automatically Create 40 Event Viewer Custom Views

I still find Custom Views useful when troubleshooting on individual workstations, and I’d recently been wondering if it was possible to push them out via GPP or similar. I started creating some views manually, as a test, but it was taking too long.

I’d recently been working on implementing Palantir’s WEF/WEC setup, and wondered whether I could leverage their legwork to automate the creation of these custom views.

The script I came up with took a fraction of the time to write, as opposed to the manual method. It does the following:

  1. Downloads the Palantir ‘windows-event-forwarding’ repo in ZIP format into a temporary folder
  2. Extracts the Event Log query out of each file in the ‘wef-subscriptions’ folder, and
    turns it into an appropriately-named custom Event Viewer view (XML) file in %PROGRAMDATA%\Microsoft\Event Viewer\Views

2017-11-07 16_51_46-Event Viewer

I love how simple PowerShell makes it to work with XML.

The script needs to be run as an admin in order to create the view files in %PROGRAMDATA%, unless you change the output path in the $templateStoragePath variable. It’ll also need to be able to connect to the Internet to download the ZIP file from GitHub.

I’ve started storing my scripts in my PowerShell GitHub repo rather than as Github Gists, and it’s harder to embed them on wordpress.com. View the code via the link below:

https://github.com/dstreefkerk/PowerShell/blob/master/Create-EventViewerCustomViews.ps1

Correct Horse Battery Staple for PowerShell, AKA Random Memorable Password Generator

I’m a fan of using correcthorsebatterystaple.net for generating temporary passwords for users, rather than always using a static password. The site itself is a reference to the XKCD webcomic, and yes, I’m aware that there are plenty of opinions on the web about this topic.

password_strength

I’ve had the idea in the back of my mind for a while to see if I could replicate the site’s functionality in PowerShell. I noticed that the source code for the site is on GitHub, so I ducked over there to check out the word list.

I found that it’s possible to replicate most of the functionality of the site with just two lines of PowerShell (although it doesn’t result in very readable code):

  1. I used Invoke-WebRequest to grab the word list from GitHub
  2. I then expanded out the Content property, and split it up given the comma delimiter
  3. I then used a combination of the Range operator, Foreach-Object, [string]::join,Get-Random and the TextInfo class to generate a given number of passwords along these rules:
    1. 4 random words, each with the first letter capitalised
    2. A separator in between
    3. A random number between 1 and 99 at the end

Note that this isn’t failure-proof, and isn’t intended to be used in any complex scenario. There’s no error handling, and not much flexibility built in. It’s just a quick function you could put into your PowerShell profile.

You can, at least, do the following:
A PowerShell window displaying the output of Get-RandomPassword. Also shows the function being called with a Count parameter as well as a separator parameter

Here’s the code:

Parse a web page and download all PDFs

Today I downloaded the great ISESteroids add-in for the PowerShell ISE. While I was on their website, I noticed that they have a collection of free PDF “cookbooks” available.

I didn’t want to save each file down manually, and liked the thought of using a PowerShell script to download PowerShell documents from a PowerShell-related website. Here’s what I did to download them all:

$psPage = Invoke-WebRequest "http://www.powertheshell.com/cookbooks/"
$urls = $psPage.ParsedHtml.getElementsByTagName("A") | ? {$_.href -like "*.pdf"} | Select-Object -ExpandProperty href

$urls | ForEach-Object {Invoke-WebRequest -Uri $_ -OutFile ($_ | Split-Path -Leaf)}